The Bird or the Cage?

166 notes

shearrob:

finalowen:

shearrob:

cuddlesomefrank:

shearrob:

phillygirl64:

Light and playful…uh huh…yeah
Attn: shearrob

But it *is*!

Sure it is Rob….

The only way to listen to Scherzo is to imagine me chuckling gleefully as I wrote it. By a swimming pool on my honeymoon. It’s a very *happy* story of sunshine and afternoon cocktails and getting splashed, that’s my memory of it. It’s *fun*! :)

The high-pitched sound that burrows its way into our brains is just the audio representation of a merry thumbs up!

Exactly. In my household, we put that little screech on every Christmas when we unwrap our presents - we think of it as jolly and as festive as Jingle Bells! And all my cousins and nephews got married to it. It always puts a smile on the face of all the members of the Shearman household.

I read this and interpreted it as all of Rob’s cousins and nephews got married to a horrible screeching noise monster. Given Rob’s way of thinking, that might be what he actually meant.

shearrob:

finalowen:

shearrob:

cuddlesomefrank:

shearrob:

phillygirl64:

Light and playful…uh huh…yeah

Attn: shearrob

But it *is*!

Sure it is Rob….

The only way to listen to Scherzo is to imagine me chuckling gleefully as I wrote it. By a swimming pool on my honeymoon. It’s a very *happy* story of sunshine and afternoon cocktails and getting splashed, that’s my memory of it. It’s *fun*! :)

The high-pitched sound that burrows its way into our brains is just the audio representation of a merry thumbs up!

Exactly. In my household, we put that little screech on every Christmas when we unwrap our presents - we think of it as jolly and as festive as Jingle Bells! And all my cousins and nephews got married to it. It always puts a smile on the face of all the members of the Shearman household.

I read this and interpreted it as all of Rob’s cousins and nephews got married to a horrible screeching noise monster. Given Rob’s way of thinking, that might be what he actually meant.

26,039 notes

dreamwurks:

ineffablye:

Like everyone always talks about how amazing Rise of the Guardians’ animation was but I think we need to all take a step back and look at the work of art that TinTin was like

image

just

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look

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at

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this

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animation

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like

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wow

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WOW

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look at this detail i cant even

When I first saw a trailer on TV I thought it was live action until I saw it again and I was like “wait is it live action”

I want to point out that Tintin was motion-captured as opposed to RotG which was completely animated, to the best of my knowledge. Not that this detracts from how great Tintin looked.

(via lostthehat)

Filed under Tintin Animation Film

71,348 notes

muirin007:

itsanexperimentjohn:

hopelessfangirl:

seapenydinuguannuclearbummer:

this is my new favorite video

Hercules reads his script entirely wrong
(reads the word disappointed, when he was supposed to sound disappointed)

New favorite thing to say when disappointed. 

I shout this all the time and I am only 70% sure people understand the reference

The best part about this whole thing is that the editors just kept it in the final version. God bless those editors.

He didn’t screw up - He was referencing a Fish Called Wanda.

(via lostthehat)

3,643 notes

Most of the characters in my fantasy and far-future science fiction books are not white. They’re mixed; they’re rainbow. In my first big science fiction novel, The Left Hand of Darkness, the only person from Earth is a black man, and everybody else in the book is Inuit (or Tibetan) brown. In the two fantasy novels the miniseries is ‘based on,’ everybody is brown or copper-red or black, except the Kargish people in the East and their descendants in the Archipelago, who are white, with fair or dark hair. The central character Tenar, a Karg, is a white brunette. Ged, an Archipelagan, is red-brown. His friend, Vetch, is black. In the [Sci Fi Channel] miniseries, Tenar is played by Smallville’s Kristin Kreuk, the only person in the miniseries who looks at all Asian. Ged and Vetch are white.

My color scheme was conscious and deliberate from the start. I didn’t see why everybody in science fiction had to be a honky named Bob or Joe or Bill. I didn’t see why everybody in heroic fantasy had to be white (and why all the leading women had ‘violet eyes’). It didn’t even make sense. Whites are a minority on Earth now—why wouldn’t they still be either a minority, or just swallowed up in the larger colored gene pool, in the future? […]

I think it is possible that some readers never even notice what color the people in the story are. Don’t notice, don’t care. Whites of course have the privilege of not caring, of being ‘colorblind.’ Nobody else does.

I have heard, not often, but very memorably, from readers of color who told me that the Earthsea books were the only books in the genre that they felt included in—and how much this meant to them, particularly as adolescents, when they’d found nothing to read in fantasy and science fiction except the adventures of white people in white worlds. Those letters have been a tremendous reward and true joy to me.

So far no reader of color has told me I ought to butt out, or that I got the ethnicity wrong. When they do, I’ll listen. As an anthropologist’s daughter, I am intensely conscious of the risk of cultural or ethnic imperialism—a white writer speaking for nonwhite people, co-opting their voice, an act of extreme arrogance. In a totally invented fantasy world, or in a far-future science fiction setting, in the rainbow world we can imagine, this risk is mitigated. That’s the beauty of science fiction and fantasy—freedom of invention.

But with all freedom comes responsibility. Which is something these filmmakers seem not to understand.

Ursula K. Le Guin, "A Whitewashed Earthsea: How the Sci Fi Channel wrecked my books" (via)

In case you weren’t aware how awesome Le Guin is.

(via blueandbluer)

(Source: zuky, via lostthehat)